Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

So Many Omes

James Gorman announces in The New York Times that "the age of 'omes' is here." The culprit for the spread of omes — from proteome to microbiome and, now, the omome — is genome, a word that he traces back to Hans Winkler in 1920 — but that didn't take off until the 1990s or so. "Various experts had differing ideas on where the suffix came from, but it seems to be one that was made up," Gorman says. "In any case, it clearly meant the totality of something." He adds that he likes the idea the omome — "the ome of all the omes" — which may be fun though not practical to study.

Some of the new words, however, have had the misfortune of receiving Jonathan Eisen's "Worst New Omics Award" — an honor he most recently bestowed upon the "sexome."

The Scan

Billions for Antivirals

The US is putting $3.2 billion toward a program to develop antivirals to treat COVID-19 in its early stages, the Wall Street Journal reports.

NFT of the Web

Tim Berners-Lee, who developed the World Wide Web, is auctioning its original source code as a non-fungible token, Reuters reports.

23andMe on the Nasdaq

23andMe's shares rose more than 20 percent following its merger with a special purpose acquisition company, as GenomeWeb has reported.

Science Papers Present GWAS of Brain Structure, System for Controlled Gene Transfer

In Science this week: genome-wide association study ties variants to white matter stricture in the brain, and more.