So Many Omes

James Gorman announces in The New York Times that "the age of 'omes' is here." The culprit for the spread of omes — from proteome to microbiome and, now, the omome — is genome, a word that he traces back to Hans Winkler in 1920 — but that didn't take off until the 1990s or so. "Various experts had differing ideas on where the suffix came from, but it seems to be one that was made up," Gorman says.

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