The Slow Revolution

Though the cost of whole-genome sequencing is falling dramatically, the University of Alberta's Timothy Caulfield writes in the Globe and Mail that having people's full genome sequences might not have as great an effect on their health as has been indicated. "The relationship between our genome and disease is far more complicated than originally anticipated.

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