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Sir James Black Dies

Sir James Black, best known for his work in creating beta-blocker drugs in the 1960s, died yesterday, the BBC reports. He was 85. Black is also credited with inventing the first effective non-surgical treatment for peptic ulcers. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1988, and he was recognized with the UK's highest honor, the Order of Merit, in 2000. His discovery of the drugs propranolol and pronethalol was "one of the few things that really deserves the moniker 'Landmark,'" Clyde Yancy, president of the American Heart Association, told the Associated Press. "Easily millions of patients have been helped with beta-blocking therapies."

The Scan

Billions for Antivirals

The US is putting $3.2 billion toward a program to develop antivirals to treat COVID-19 in its early stages, the Wall Street Journal reports.

NFT of the Web

Tim Berners-Lee, who developed the World Wide Web, is auctioning its original source code as a non-fungible token, Reuters reports.

23andMe on the Nasdaq

23andMe's shares rose more than 20 percent following its merger with a special purpose acquisition company, as GenomeWeb has reported.

Science Papers Present GWAS of Brain Structure, System for Controlled Gene Transfer

In Science this week: genome-wide association study ties variants to white matter stricture in the brain, and more.