Researchers from the J. Craig Venter Institute and the Ludwig Cancer Institute identified genomic rearrangements in a breast cancer cell line using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing. They used 454 Life Sciences sequencing to identify those rearrangements. The gene fusions and truncations they noted included ones that affected the MRE11 and NSD1 genes, which are already known to be involved in oncogenesis. Their work appears in the current issue of PNAS.

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The UK's Nuffield Council on Bioethics says genetically modifying human embryos could be morally permissible, according to the Guardian.

A new Nature Biotechnology paper reports that CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing can lead to large deletions or complex rearrangements that could be pathogenic.

The Wall Street Journal likens a prototype developed by Synthetic Genomics to a "biological fax machine."

In PNAS this week: strategy for reactivating Rett syndrome-linked MECP2, small molecules able to suppress Staphylococcus aureus virulence, and more.