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Scientists, Get Your CVs Ready

At the CED Life Sciences Conference this week, Sanofi CEO Chris Viehbacher said that researchers who work for big pharma tend to be the least innovative, reports Pharmalot's Ed Silverman. The best scientists, Viehbacher said, work for small biotechs — that's why Sanofi is reducing its internal research capacity and partnering with outside companies, biotechs, and universities to get R&D done. "The reality is the best people who have great ideas in science don’t want to work for a big company. They want to create their own company," Viehbacher added. "So, in other words, if you want to work with the best people, you’re going to have go outside your own company and work with those people."

Silverman says Viehbacher is trying to justify Sanofi's recent job cuts by saying that the company's scientists aren't the best. "We wonder how this will boost morale among Sanofi scientists. Probably not by much," Silverman adds. "But those who are truly insightful will find a way to start their own operation or sign on with a biotech somewhere, proving his point, yes?”

The Scan

Alzheimer's Risk Gene Among Women

CNN reports that researchers have found that variants in MGMT contribute to Alzheimer's disease risk among women but not men.

Still Hanging Around

The Guardian writes that persistent pockets of SARS-CoV-2 in the body could contribute to long COVID.

Through a Little Spit

Enteric viruses like norovirus may also be transmitted through saliva, not just the fecal-oral route, according to New Scientist.

Nature Papers Present Method to Detect Full Transcriptome, Viruses Infecting Asgard Archaea, More

In Nature this week: VASA-seq approach to detect full transcriptome, analysis of viruses infecting Asgard archaea, and more.