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Researchers Discover Three Genes Linked to Clotting

In a study in the American Journal of Human Genetics, researchers at the University of Edinburgh say they've discovered three genes that make a substantial contribution to blood-clotting times. The team, led by Ian Deary, says identifying the genes could further scientists' understanding of deep vein thrombosis, heart attacks, and some types of stroke. The study looked for associations between 500,000 genetic markers and clotting time, measured by activated partial thromboplastin time. Three genes — F12, HRG, and KNG1 — seemed to be responsible for a substantial amount of the variation in clotting speed among healthy individuals. Deary says the researchers are planning to follow up on the findings to establish their clinical significance.

The Scan

Not Kept "Clean and Sanitary"

A Food and Drug Administration inspection uncovered problems with cross contamination at an Emergent BioSolutions facility, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Resumption Recommendation Expected

The Washington Post reports that US officials are expected to give the go-ahead to resume using Johnson & Johnson's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.

Canada's New Budget on Science

Science writes that Canada's new budget includes funding for the life sciences, but not as much as hoped for investigator-driven research.

Nature Papers Examine Single-Cell, Multi-Omic SARS-CoV-2 Response; Flatfish Sequences; More

In Nature this week: single-cell, multi-omics analysis provides insight into COVID-19 pathogenesis, evolution of flatfish, and more.