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Remembering Joshua Lederberg

Joshua Lederberg, who won the Nobel Prize in 1958, died last Saturday from pneumonia. While in graduate school, he discovered that bacteria could reproduce sexually and he named the rings of DNA that E. coli exchanged "plasmids." He also led the way for molecular biology and biotechnology: "Josh was one of the most creative scientists of our times," Stanford's Stanley Cohen tells the Los Angeles Times. Lederberg was 82.

The Scan

Gone, But Now Reconstructed SARS-CoV-2 Genomes

In a preprint, a researcher describes his recovery of viral sequences that had been removed from a common database.

Rare Heart Inflammation Warning

The Food and Drug Administration is adding a warning about links between a rare inflammatory heart condition and two SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, Reuters reports.

Sandwich Sampling

The New York Times sent tuna sandwiches for PCR analysis.

Nature Papers Describe Gut Viruses, New Format for Storing Quantitative Genomic Data, More

In Nature this week: catalog of DNA viruses of the human gut microbiome, new dense depth data dump format to store quantitative genomic data, and more.