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Remember, Pfizer, There's No Such Thing as Bad News

Pfizer can't be pleased to be making such frequent appearances in the media. New York Times reports that expert reviewers have concluded that Pfizer "manipulated the publication of scientific studies to bolster the use of its epilepsy drug Neurontin for other disorders, while suppressing research that did not support those uses," according to the article. It continues:

Pfizer's tactics included delaying the publication of studies that had found no evidence the drug worked for some other disorders, "spinning" negative data to place it in a more positive light, and bundling negative findings with positive studies to neutralize the results, according to written reports by the experts, who analyzed the documents at the request of the plaintiffs' lawyers.

Pfizer released a statement denying any manipulation of the data, but it must've been tough to get that out with its reorg going on. This Wall Street Journal article has details on the pharma's plans to restructure, including efforts to "create divisions that are more global in focus, and will move certain drug-development functions out of the traditional research arm and into the commercial groups that also handle sales and marketing." Changes will take place in January.

 

The Scan

Pig Organ Transplants Considered

The Wall Street Journal reports that the US Food and Drug Administration may soon allow clinical trials that involve transplanting pig organs into humans.

'Poo-Bank' Proposal

Harvard Medical School researchers suggest people should bank stool samples when they are young to transplant when they later develop age-related diseases.

Spurred to Develop Again

New Scientist reports that researchers may have uncovered why about 60 percent of in vitro fertilization embryos stop developing.

Science Papers Examine Breast Milk Cell Populations, Cerebral Cortex Cellular Diversity, Micronesia Population History

In Science this week: unique cell populations found within breast milk, 100 transcriptionally distinct cell populations uncovered in the cerebral cortex, and more.