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Putting Feces to Work

This one's not for your lunch break: Daisy Ginsberg and James King, from London's Royal College of Art, teamed up with the University of Cambridge's International Genetically Engineered Machine Jamboree team to create a "Scatalog" — a briefcase full of wax stool sample models flecked with different colors. The Cambridge group transformed E. coli "into a living, color-coded chemical detector they dubbed E. chromi," The Scientist reports. "E. chromi can detect arsenic and turn orange or red or brown or purple or yellow depending on how much it finds."

The Scan

Not Kept "Clean and Sanitary"

A Food and Drug Administration inspection uncovered problems with cross contamination at an Emergent BioSolutions facility, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Resumption Recommendation Expected

The Washington Post reports that US officials are expected to give the go-ahead to resume using Johnson & Johnson's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.

Canada's New Budget on Science

Science writes that Canada's new budget includes funding for the life sciences, but not as much as hoped for investigator-driven research.

Nature Papers Examine Single-Cell, Multi-Omic SARS-CoV-2 Response; Flatfish Sequences; More

In Nature this week: single-cell, multi-omics analysis provides insight into COVID-19 pathogenesis, evolution of flatfish, and more.