Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

New Support for an Old Story

About 3,000 years ago, the story goes, the Queen of Sheba left Ethiopia to meet with King Solomon in Israel, and they had a child. Now, says New Scientist's Hannah Krakauer, the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Luca Pagani may be able to show that the meeting may not have taken place entirely in the imaginations of story-tellers. In a new study appearing in the American Journal of Human Genetics, Pagani reports his examination of Ethiopian genomes. He reports having noticed that some had a mix of both African and non-African lineages, Krakauer says. "Delving deeper, Pagani and his colleagues discovered that the non-African genetic components had much more in common with people living in Syria and around the eastern Mediterranean than in the nearer Arabian peninsula," she adds. "What's more, the gene flow probably took place around 3,000 years ago." The story of the Queen of Sheba and King Solomon may be a legend, but it may actually represent a real meeting of the populations around that time, Pagani tells New Scientist.

Our sister publication GenomeWeb Daily News has more on this study.

The Scan

Drug Response Variants May Be Distinct in Somatic, Germline Samples

Based on variants from across 21 drug response genes, researchers in The Pharmacogenomics Journal suspect that tumor-only DNA sequences may miss drug response clues found in the germline.

Breast Cancer Risk Gene Candidates Found by Multi-Ancestry Low-Frequency Variant Analysis

Researchers narrowed in on new and known risk gene candidates with variant profiles for almost 83,500 individuals with breast cancer and 59,199 unaffected controls in Genome Medicine.

Health-Related Quality of Life Gets Boost After Microbiome-Based Treatment for Recurrent C. Diff

A secondary analysis of Phase 3 clinical trial data in JAMA Network Open suggests an investigational oral microbiome-based drug may lead to enhanced quality of life measures.

Study Follows Consequences of Early Confirmatory Trials for Accelerated Approval Indications

Time to traditional approval or withdrawal was shorter when confirmatory trials started prior to accelerated approval, though overall regulatory outcomes remained similar, a JAMA study finds.