Promises and Problems

Accepting the D.C. White Research and Mentoring Award at ASM this year, the J. Craig Venter Institute's Ken Nealson said the promises made by genomics and metagenomics have served to both draw him in and expose the problems inherent in both fields. The first promise, Nealson said, is that learning an organism's functions and the structure of its genome will enable researchers to predict how it will act in nature. Nealson used his work with the bacteria Shewanella oneidensis to illustrate problems with the first promise. Many genes don't do what they're supposed to do, he said.

To read the full story....

Register for Free.

...and receive Daily News bulletins.

Already have an account?
Login Now.

In a commentary at eLife, Brandeis University's Eve Marder calls on researchers to value and pursue truth.

Researchers have developed a way to quickly edit white blood cells, according to the New York Times.

In Science this week: rice gene enables plants to grow quickly in times of flooding, and more.

Education-linked genetic variants could also predict a small portion of a person's social mobility, Newsweek reports.