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Pie in the Sky

Nobel laureate Harold Varmus tells the Globe and Mail that progress in cancer research for the next few years will "be singles and doubles but not home runs." Varmus, who is the head of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, says that there have been unrealistically high expectations for cancer research since US President Nixon declared war on it in 1971, and that media hype fuels those high hopes. "The hope that advocacy groups understandably have – that if we just do a little bit more research and apply it at the bedside, that we're going to cure cancer – is really terribly simplistic," he says.

Varmus also adds that how people are taught science in school, focusing on outcomes and not the process, maintains a "culture of unrealistic expectations." Varmus was in Toronto to receive the Henry G. Friesen International Prize in Health Research.

The Scan

US Booster Eligibility Decision

The US CDC director recommends that people at high risk of developing COVID-19 due to their jobs also be eligible for COVID-19 boosters, in addition to those 65 years old and older or with underlying medical conditions.

Arizona Bill Before Judge

The Arizona Daily Star reports that a judge is weighing whether a new Arizona law restricting abortion due to genetic conditions is a ban or a restriction.

Additional Genes

Wales is rolling out new genetic testing service for cancer patients, according to BBC News.

Science Papers Examine State of Human Genomic Research, Single-Cell Protein Quantification

In Science this week: a number of editorials and policy reports discuss advances in human genomic research, and more.