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That PhD Doesn't Stop the Chores

Female scientists do about twice as many household chores as male scientists, according to a Stanford University study in the current issue of Academe. “Partnered women scientists at places like Stanford University do 54 percent of the cooking, cleaning, and laundry in their households; partnered men scientists do just 28 percent,” write authors Londa Schiebinger and Shannon Gilmartin, who also show that women work the same number of hours, 56, at their paying jobs. In an interesting anecdote, The Chronicle of Higher Education points out that when Carol Greider received her call from Stockholm telling her she’d won the Nobel prize, she was home, folding laundry. The study authors suggest that institutions cover household labor assistance as part of their benefits package. “I think supporting housework is a way universities can guard their investment in these young faculty members,” Schiebinger says in The Chronicle.

The Scan

UK Pilot Study Suggests Digital Pathway May Expand BRCA Testing in Breast Cancer

A randomized pilot study in the Journal of Medical Genetics points to similar outcomes for breast cancer patients receiving germline BRCA testing through fully digital or partially digital testing pathways.

Survey Sees Genetic Literacy on the Rise, Though Further Education Needed

Survey participants appear to have higher genetic familiarity, knowledge, and skills compared to 2013, though 'room for improvement' remains, an AJHG paper finds.

Study Reveals Molecular, Clinical Features in Colorectal Cancer Cases Involving Multiple Primary Tumors

Researchers compare mismatch repair, microsatellite instability, and tumor mutation burden patterns in synchronous multiple- or single primary colorectal cancers.

FarGen Phase One Sequences Exomes of Nearly 500 From Faroe Islands

The analysis in the European Journal of Human Genetics finds few rare variants and limited geographic structure among Faroese individuals.