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That PhD Doesn't Stop the Chores

Female scientists do about twice as many household chores as male scientists, according to a Stanford University study in the current issue of Academe. “Partnered women scientists at places like Stanford University do 54 percent of the cooking, cleaning, and laundry in their households; partnered men scientists do just 28 percent,” write authors Londa Schiebinger and Shannon Gilmartin, who also show that women work the same number of hours, 56, at their paying jobs. In an interesting anecdote, The Chronicle of Higher Education points out that when Carol Greider received her call from Stockholm telling her she’d won the Nobel prize, she was home, folding laundry. The study authors suggest that institutions cover household labor assistance as part of their benefits package. “I think supporting housework is a way universities can guard their investment in these young faculty members,” Schiebinger says in The Chronicle.

The Scan

US Booster Eligibility Decision

The US CDC director recommends that people at high risk of developing COVID-19 due to their jobs also be eligible for COVID-19 boosters, in addition to those 65 years old and older or with underlying medical conditions.

Arizona Bill Before Judge

The Arizona Daily Star reports that a judge is weighing whether a new Arizona law restricting abortion due to genetic conditions is a ban or a restriction.

Additional Genes

Wales is rolling out new genetic testing service for cancer patients, according to BBC News.

Science Papers Examine State of Human Genomic Research, Single-Cell Protein Quantification

In Science this week: a number of editorials and policy reports discuss advances in human genomic research, and more.