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Paying for Play?

In response to a reader's question, Dr. Isis discusses why scientists sometimes have to pay to be published. She writes that originally, scientists submitted their work to journals that their academic libraries, departments, or even they themselves subscribed to; those subscription fees kept the journals funded. Then the rise of public access and open access brought about author fees to defray publication costs, she says.

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The Japan Times reports that researchers sequenced the genome of a woman who lived during the Jomon period.

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