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Paying for Play?

In response to a reader's question, Dr. Isis discusses why scientists sometimes have to pay to be published. She writes that originally, scientists submitted their work to journals that their academic libraries, departments, or even they themselves subscribed to; those subscription fees kept the journals funded. Then the rise of public access and open access brought about author fees to defray publication costs, she says. "My favorite journal, The Journal of Applied Physiology, asks for a $50 submission fee while The Public Library of Science requires between $1300-$2850 for publication," Isis blogs. She asks Bora Zivkovic, the online discussion manager for PLoS, if the high fees affect what is ultimately published. His response: no, because PLoS waives fees -- no questions asked -- for scientists who might not be able to afford them.

The Scan

mRNA-Based Vaccine on the Way in China

China may soon have its own mRNA-based vaccine, according to Nature News.

Arranged Killing, Fraud Alleged by Prosecutors

The Wall Street Journal reports that prosecutors allege that the co-founder of a biotech arranged to have a business associate who threatened to expose him as a fraud killed.

Whirlwind Decade of CRISPR

The New York Times looks back at the 10 years since the University of California, Berkeley's Jennifer Doudna and her colleagues published their CRISPR paper.

PNAS Papers on Blue Cone Monochromacy Structural Variants, HIV-1 Mutant, T-ALL

In PNAS this week: structural variants linked to blue cone monochromacy, HIV-1 variants affecting the matrix protein p17, and more.