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Paying for Play?

In response to a reader's question, Dr. Isis discusses why scientists sometimes have to pay to be published. She writes that originally, scientists submitted their work to journals that their academic libraries, departments, or even they themselves subscribed to; those subscription fees kept the journals funded. Then the rise of public access and open access brought about author fees to defray publication costs, she says. "My favorite journal, The Journal of Applied Physiology, asks for a $50 submission fee while The Public Library of Science requires between $1300-$2850 for publication," Isis blogs. She asks Bora Zivkovic, the online discussion manager for PLoS, if the high fees affect what is ultimately published. His response: no, because PLoS waives fees -- no questions asked -- for scientists who might not be able to afford them.

The Scan

Could Cost Billions

NBC News reports that the new Alzheimer's disease drug from Biogen could cost Medicare in the US billions of dollars.

Not Quite Sent

The Biden Administration likely won't meet its goal of sending 80 million SARS-CoV-2 vaccine doses abroad by the end of the month, according to the Washington Post.

DTC Regulation Proposals

A new report calls on UK policymakers to review direct-to-consumer genetic testing regulations, the Independent reports.

PNAS Papers on Mosquito MicroRNAs, Acute Kidney Injury, Trichothiodystrophy

In PNAS this week: microRNAs involved in Aedes aegypti reproduction, proximal tubule cell response to kidney injury, and more.