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One a Week

WashU's David Dooling tells O'Reilly Radar's James Turner about all the genome sequencing work going on at his university, where scientists can now sequence a human genome with complete coverage in a week. "Now with 35 to 40 machines, we can generate lots of sequence on lots of different humans. And so that opens up a whole new line of analysis of comparative genomics where you're comparing human to human to human to human genomes," Dooling says. "This was an analysis that wasn't even feasible two years ago. Now it's something that's becoming more and more routine." Check out the full interview here.

The Scan

NFTs for Genome Sharing

Nature News writes that non-fungible tokens could be a way for people to profit from sharing genomic data.

Wastewater Warning System

Time magazine writes that cities and college campuses are monitoring sewage for SARS-CoV-2, an approach officials hope lasts beyond COVID-19.

Networks to Boost Surveillance

Scientific American writes that new organizations and networks aim to improve the ability of developing countries to conduct SARS-CoV-2 genomic surveillance.

Genome Biology Papers on Gastric Cancer Epimutations, BUTTERFLY, GUNC Tool

In Genome Biology this week: recurrent epigenetic mutations in gastric cancer, correction tool for unique molecular identifier-based assays, and more.