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Not to Worry

The US Supreme Court's decision to take up a gene patenting case isn't worrying some diagnostic companies, The Wall Street Journal reports. Earlier this month, the court announced that it would again be considering the American Civil Liberties Union's case concerning Myriad Genetics' patents regarding BRCA1 and BRCA2, as our sister publication GenomeWeb Daily News reported then.

No more gene patents could be a "positive development," Wendy Bost, a spokesperson for Quest Diagnostics tells the Journal, "because it would open new opportunities to develop new testing services based on gene discoveries."

Additionally, the chief executive of AutoGenomics, Fareed Kureshy, says that "if the Supreme Court rules that gene patents are not applicable, you'll see a lot more tests. ... If they decide in favor of Myriad, it will be business as usual."

Myriad says that its patents aren't on the genes, but on the isolated DNA and the process. The Journal adds that in its filings, Myriad has also noted that "human ingenuity [is] required to create isolated DNA molecules."

The Scan

J&J Booster Support

A US Food and Drug Administration advisory panel has voted to support a booster dose of Johnson & Johnson's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, according to the Los Angeles Times.

To Keep the Cases Moving

The president of the UK Royal College of Pathologists tells the Financial Times that more investment is needed to tackle a backlog of cases.

NAS Expels Archaeologist

Science reports Luis Jaime Castillo Butters' expulsion is the first of an international member from the US National Academy of Sciences.

PLOS Papers on Angelman Syndrome-Like Cases, Salmonella Paratyphi A, SARS-CoV-2 in Brazil

In PLOS this week: exome sequencing analysis of Angelman syndrome-like cases, genetic epidemiology of Salmonella Paratyphi A, and more.