Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Not That Close to Neandertals

A team lead by Svante Pääbo at the Max-Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology have used next-gen sequencing to complete the reconstruction of a 38,000 year-old Neandertal mitochondrial genome. The DNA was taken from a leg bone fossil found in a cave in Croatia, says the UK’s Guardian. Pääbo's team found that the mitochondrial genes "were distinctly different to modern humans, suggesting Neanderthals never, or rarely, interbred with early humans." Their findings, published in Cell, also show that a Neanderthal "Eve" lived around 660,000 years ago, and that the species lived in very small numbers, maybe only 10,000 alive at any one time.

The Scan

Rise of BA.5

The New York Times reports that the Omicron subvariant BA.5 has become the dominant version of SARS-CoV-2 in the US.

UK Health Secretary Resigns

Sajid Javid, the UK health secretary, resigned along with Chancellor Rishi Sunak, saying they cannot work with Prime Minister Boris Johnson's government, CNN reports.

Clones From Freeze-Dried Cells

A team in Japan has cloned mice from freeze-dried skin cells, according to the Guardian.

Genome Research Papers on Craniosynostosis, Macaque Retrotransposition, More

In Genome Research this week: structural variants in craniosynostosis, LINE-1 activity in rhesus macaque brain, and more.