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Not That Close to Neandertals

A team lead by Svante Pääbo at the Max-Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology have used next-gen sequencing to complete the reconstruction of a 38,000 year-old Neandertal mitochondrial genome. The DNA was taken from a leg bone fossil found in a cave in Croatia, says the UK’s Guardian. Pääbo's team found that the mitochondrial genes "were distinctly different to modern humans, suggesting Neanderthals never, or rarely, interbred with early humans." Their findings, published in Cell, also show that a Neanderthal "Eve" lived around 660,000 years ago, and that the species lived in very small numbers, maybe only 10,000 alive at any one time.

The Scan

Gone, But Now Reconstructed SARS-CoV-2 Genomes

In a preprint, a researcher describes his recovery of viral sequences that had been removed from a common database.

Rare Heart Inflammation Warning

The Food and Drug Administration is adding a warning about links between a rare inflammatory heart condition and two SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, Reuters reports.

Sandwich Sampling

The New York Times sent tuna sandwiches for PCR analysis.

Nature Papers Describe Gut Viruses, New Format for Storing Quantitative Genomic Data, More

In Nature this week: catalog of DNA viruses of the human gut microbiome, new dense depth data dump format to store quantitative genomic data, and more.