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Nobody's Perfect

A non-genomics researcher mentioned to Mike the Mad Biologist that there was a lot of criticism of the E. coli 104:H4 outbreak sequences, and Mike writes on his blog that he wasn't sure what his colleague was referring to. Then he realized that assessments of the quality of the sequence data could look like criticism of the science to an outsider, even when it's not. With a high-quality sequence, Mike writes that the error rate could be between 1 in 100,000 and 1 in 1,000,000 per base. "That sounds good until you realize that a typical E. coli genome is around five million bases long," Mike says, later adding that "no genome sequence, even a finished one, is perfect. But we can still do good science, even as we recognize the flaws in the data."

The Scan

Not Kept "Clean and Sanitary"

A Food and Drug Administration inspection uncovered problems with cross contamination at an Emergent BioSolutions facility, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Resumption Recommendation Expected

The Washington Post reports that US officials are expected to give the go-ahead to resume using Johnson & Johnson's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.

Canada's New Budget on Science

Science writes that Canada's new budget includes funding for the life sciences, but not as much as hoped for investigator-driven research.

Nature Papers Examine Single-Cell, Multi-Omic SARS-CoV-2 Response; Flatfish Sequences; More

In Nature this week: single-cell, multi-omics analysis provides insight into COVID-19 pathogenesis, evolution of flatfish, and more.