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No, No, You Have it All Wrong

In light of the ACLU versus Myriad Genetics case, David Ewing Duncan at Tech Review asks the age-old question: "Should human DNA be owned?" In the US, Duncan says that an individual's BRCA1 gene cannot be patented, but that Myriad could patent a mutated gene sequence associated with breast cancer. Then, patients' genes could be compared to the patented sequence -- that is what the ACLU and other plaintiffs say is a mistake. Duncan says the complaint is beside the point. "The dustup about to unfold in the ACLU vs. Myriad case misses the real issue, which is how to best push forward and clinically validate the thousands of biomarkers now languishing in databases," he writes.

The Scan

Billions for Antivirals

The US is putting $3.2 billion toward a program to develop antivirals to treat COVID-19 in its early stages, the Wall Street Journal reports.

NFT of the Web

Tim Berners-Lee, who developed the World Wide Web, is auctioning its original source code as a non-fungible token, Reuters reports.

23andMe on the Nasdaq

23andMe's shares rose more than 20 percent following its merger with a special purpose acquisition company, as GenomeWeb has reported.

Science Papers Present GWAS of Brain Structure, System for Controlled Gene Transfer

In Science this week: genome-wide association study ties variants to white matter stricture in the brain, and more.