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No More Chimps

The Institute of Medicine has released a report saying that invasive medical experiments on chimpanzees should stop, reports Wired Science's Brandon Keim. IOM's report says that the experiments inflict both physical and mental harm on the chimps, and can only be justified when there are no possible alternatives for experimentation. A 12-member IOM committee concluded that while the chimp has been a valuable animal model in the past, the emergence of new models and technologies has rendered use of the chimp unnecessary in most cases, Keim says. And while only suggestions IOM's recommendations often influence policy.

Shortly after the report's release, NIH Director Francis Collins announced that he has decided to accept the recommendations, Keim says. "The report recommended the NIH establish an independent oversight committee to evaluate each study, limiting biomedical experiments only to what is absolutely necessary and ensuring that all research is ethically conducted. No new research funding will be granted until the recommendations are in place," he adds.

The Scan

Researchers Compare WGS, Exome Sequencing-Based Mendelian Disease Diagnosis

Investigators find a diagnostic edge for whole-genome sequencing, while highlighting the cost advantages and improving diagnostic rate of exome sequencing in EJHG.

Researchers Retrace Key Mutations in Reassorted H1N1 Swine Flu Virus With Avian-Like Features

Mutations in the acidic polymerase-coding gene boost the pathogenicity and transmissibility of Eurasian avian-like H1N1 swine influenza viruses, a PNAS paper finds.

Genome Sequences Reveal Evolutionary History of South America's Canids

An analysis in PNAS of South American canid species' genomes offers a look at their evolutionary history, as well as their relationships and adaptations.

Lung Cancer Response to Checkpoint Inhibitors Reflected in Circulating Tumor DNA

In non-small cell lung cancer patients, researchers find in JCO Precision Oncology that survival benefits after immune checkpoint blockade coincide with a dip in ctDNA levels.