NIH Seeks Reproducibility | GenomeWeb

One overarching problem facing global scientific research communities today is that too many research projects produce results that don't seem to be reproducible, thereby failing a basic tenet of science. If someone publishes a study saying that alcoholic housecats grossly overestimate their leaping abilities compared to non-alcoholic cats, then one should be able to reproduce the same study and see the same antic results, right? The stakes are far higher, of course, if the results cover the efficacy of a new cancer drug or stem cell treatments, as they often do.

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