One overarching problem facing global scientific research communities today is that too many research projects produce results that don't seem to be reproducible, thereby failing a basic tenet of science. If someone publishes a study saying that alcoholic housecats grossly overestimate their leaping abilities compared to non-alcoholic cats, then one should be able to reproduce the same study and see the same antic results, right? The stakes are far higher, of course, if the results cover the efficacy of a new cancer drug or stem cell treatments, as they often do.

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The UK's Human Fertility and Embryology Authority calls for consumer genetic testing companies to warn customers that testing could uncover family secrets, according to the Guardian.

The New York Times reports that United Nations delegates have been discussing how to govern the genetic resources of the deep sea.

Researchers have transplanted edited cells into mice that appear to combat cocaine addiction, New Scientist reports.

In PNAS this week: analysis of proteolytic enzymes secreted by circulating tumor cells, phylogenetic study of Fv1 evolution, and more.