Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

New Rule

The Department of Health and Human Services is proposing new rules about how researchers can use human subjects in their studies, reports The New York Times' Andrew Pollack. The government says the new guidelines strengthen protections for study subjects and reduce red tape. "The officials said the changes were needed to deal with a vastly altered research climate, whose new features include genomics studies using patients' DNA samples, the use of the Internet and a growing reliance on studies that take place at many sites at once," Pollack says. The changes include adjustments in informed consent standards and to institutional review boards. Some researchers, however, say the changes will impede their work, not help it. The process, however, is still in the early stages, so concerned stakeholders can still be heard during the public comment period over the next 60 days, Pollack says.

The Scan

Myotonic Dystrophy Repeat Detected in Family Genome Sequencing Analysis

While sequencing individuals from a multi-generation family, researchers identified a myotonic dystrophy type 2-related short tandem repeat in the European Journal of Human Genetics.

TB Resistance Insights Gleaned From Genome Sequence, Antimicrobial Response Assays

Researchers in PLOS Biology explore M. tuberculosis resistance with a combination of sequencing and assays looking at the minimum inhibitory concentrations of 13 drugs.

Mendelian Disease Genes Prioritized Using Tissue-Specific Expression Clues

Mendelian gene candidates could be flagged for further functional analyses based on tissue-specific transcriptome and proteome profiles, a new Journal of Human Genetics paper says.

Single-Cell Sequencing Points to Embryo Mosaicism

Mosaicism may affect preimplantation genetic tests for aneuploidy, a single-cell sequencing-based analysis of almost three dozen embryos in PLOS Genetics finds.