If you want to put an end to malaria in the regions where it wreaks wretched havoc on populations — malaria kills 1 million people annually — one method would be to simply get rid of the mosquitoes that feast on human blood and leave their hosts with a plasmodium as a parting gift.

If only that were so easy. Many methods have been tried to banish Anopheles mosquitoes from a region, including strafing with pesticides and draining swamps and ponds. But what if we could just wipe out all the females that lay the eggs in the first place?

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