The UK is launching a modern version of its 18th century Longitude Prize, the Associated Press reports.

The 1714 version of the competition sought a way to determine a ship's position at sea without relying on clocks whose mechanisms were often affected by condition at sea; John Harrison, a Yorkshire clockmaker, won that competition with his invention of the marine chronometer.

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