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Mildred Cohn Dies

Mildred Cohn, who pioneered using stable isotopes to trace how enzymes work in cells, has died, reports the Los Angeles Times. She was 96. In addition to her work using stable isotopes to study biochemical reactions, Cohn also used NMR to study the role of ATP as an energy source in the cell. Over the course of her career, Cohn worked with many Nobel laureates, including Harold Urey, as she struggled with prejudice. After finishing her doctorate, Cohn had trouble finding a job since, as the LA Times writes, "recruiters were seeking 'PhD candidates, male and Christian.'" Cohn later joined the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania and she retired from there in 1985.

The Scan

Tens of Millions Saved

The Associated Press writes that vaccines against COVID-19 saved an estimated 20 million lives in their first year.

Supersized Bacterium

NPR reports that researchers have found and characterized a bacterium that is visible to the naked eye.

Also Subvariants

Moderna says its bivalent SARS-CoV-2 vaccine leads to a strong immune response against Omicron subvariants, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Science Papers Present Gene-Edited Mouse Models of Liver Cancer, Hürthle Cell Carcinoma Analysis

In Science this week: a collection of mouse models of primary liver cancer, and more.