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Of Mice and Women

Nature News reports that the lack of female research participants — from basic research in animals to clinical trials with human patients — has significant consequences, such as, "for example, when drug candidates fail to get regulatory approval because they don’t work in women in late-stage clinical trials." Nature notes that researchers tend to prefer the use of male lab animals to limit the potential for the variability of female animals’ estrous cycles, and that the ratio of male- to female-only studies in basic neuroscience is 5.5 to 1. According to Nature, investigators in attendance at the Workshop on Sex Differences and Implications for Translational Neuroscience Research, suggested that journals require authors to report the sex of the animals used in their research and that funding agencies should ask grant applicants to disclose the sex of the animals they propose to study, "and justify their decision whenever they chose only male animals."

The Scan

New Study Highlights Role of Genetics in ADHD

Researchers report in Nature Genetics on differences in genetic architecture between ADHD affecting children versus ADHD that persists into adulthood or is diagnosed in adults.

Study Highlights Pitfall of Large Gene Panels in Clinical Genomic Analysis

An analysis in Genetics in Medicine finds that as gene panels get larger, there is an increased chance of uncovering benign candidate variants.

Single-Cell Atlas of Drosophila Embryogenesis

A new paper in Science presents a single-cell atlas of fruit fly embryonic development over time.

Phage Cocktail Holds Promise for IBD

Researchers uncovered a combination phage therapy that targets Klebsiella pneumonia strains among individuals experiencing inflammatory bowel disease flare ups, as they report in Cell.