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Marshall Nirenberg Dies

Marshall Nirenberg, winner of the 1968 Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine, has died, reports The Scientist. He was 82. Nirenberg shared the Nobel for his work on studying protein synthesis, namely for confirming the existence of mRNA and determining how codons specify what protein is formed. The Scientist points out that Nirenberg, as the head of the Laboratory of Biochemical Genetics at the NIH's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, was the first NIH scientist to win a Nobel prize. "He discovered common language used throughout the living matter from the simplest virus to the most complicated living matter, human being[s],” wrote Akira Kaji of the University of Pennsylvania and Hideko Kaji of Thomas Jefferson University to The Scientist.

The Scan

New Study Highlights Role of Genetics in ADHD

Researchers report in Nature Genetics on differences in genetic architecture between ADHD affecting children versus ADHD that persists into adulthood or is diagnosed in adults.

Study Highlights Pitfall of Large Gene Panels in Clinical Genomic Analysis

An analysis in Genetics in Medicine finds that as gene panels get larger, there is an increased chance of uncovering benign candidate variants.

Single-Cell Atlas of Drosophila Embryogenesis

A new paper in Science presents a single-cell atlas of fruit fly embryonic development over time.

Phage Cocktail Holds Promise for IBD

Researchers uncovered a combination phage therapy that targets Klebsiella pneumonia strains among individuals experiencing inflammatory bowel disease flare ups, as they report in Cell.