The life sciences field needs better, more flexible, upgradeable, and scientist-friendly big data management tools. John Boyle, soon to be senior director of bioinformatics at Kymab, writes in Nature.

Boyle says that many data management projects focused on the helping life sciences investigators manage and analyze large data sets have failed because these systems are hard to create, harder to use, and have used a one-size-fits-all approach.

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