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Lynn Margulis Dies

Lynn Margulis, who developed the endosymbiotic theory for the origins of some cellular organelles, has died, according to a note on the Web page of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst's geosciences department where she was a professor. Margulis was 73. She was also known for her contributions to James Lovelock's Gaia hypothesis that the living and non-living components of the Earth together comprise a self-regulating system. "She was smart, creative, and promoter of a lot of wild ideas … and to her credit, some of them were even right," writes PZ Myers at Pharyngula. "I think her greatest strength was her eagerness to step right out to the edge of science and push, push, push — sometimes futilely, but sometimes she really did succeed in pushing back the frontier a bit."

The Scan

Not Yet a Permanent One

NPR says the lack of a permanent Food and Drug Administration commissioner has "flummoxed" public health officials.

Unfair Targeting

Technology Review writes that a new report says the US has been unfairly targeting Chinese and Chinese-American individuals in economic espionage cases.

Limited Rapid Testing

The New York Times wonders why rapid tests for COVID-19 are not widely available in the US.

Genome Research Papers on IPAFinder, Structural Variant Expression Effects, Single-Cell RNA-Seq Markers

In Genome Research this week: IPAFinder method to detect intronic polyadenylation, influence of structural variants on gene expression, and more.