Obstacles to cheaper and cheaper sequencing are falling by the wayside, writes Eilene Zimmerman at CNN Money. She notes that when James Watson had his genome sequenced by 454 in 2007, it cost about $1 million, but newer technologies are bringing that cost drastically down.

"The cost-per-bit of biologic information is coming down faster than Moore's Law," Steven Burrill, from the financial services firm Burrill & Company tells her.

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