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Looking at Early Humans

A new paper from Svante Pääbo's group reports that they recovered a complete mitochondrial DNA sequence from a 30,000-year-old early modern human from Kostenki, Russia. In Current Biology, the researchers recount how they used a primer-extension capture method, which they developed for working with Neandertals, to capture ancient DNA to be sequenced. They compared the early modern human mtDNA to that of Neandertals and modern humans and found that the early modern human mtDNA belongs to the U2 haplotype, which today is found in North African, western Asian, and European populations. "We can now do what I thought was impossible just a year ago – determine reliable DNA sequences from modern humans - but this is still possible only from very well-preserved specimens," Pääbo says, according to Scientific Blogging.

HT: European Genetics and Anthropology Blog, Dienekes' Anthropology Blog

The Scan

LINE-1 Linked to Premature Aging Conditions

Researchers report in Science Translational Medicine that the accumulation of LINE-1 RNA contributes to premature aging conditions and that symptoms can be improved by targeting them.

Team Presents Cattle Genotype-Tissue Expression Atlas

Using RNA sequences representing thousands of cattle samples, researchers looked at relationships between cattle genotype and tissue expression in Nature Genetics.

Researchers Map Recombination in Khoe-San Population

With whole-genome sequences for dozens of individuals from the Nama population, researchers saw in Genome Biology fine-scale recombination patterns that clustered outside of other populations.

Myotonic Dystrophy Repeat Detected in Family Genome Sequencing Analysis

While sequencing individuals from a multi-generation family, researchers identified a myotonic dystrophy type 2-related short tandem repeat in the European Journal of Human Genetics.