On their own, many cryptic mutations may not amount to much, but together they can allow organisms to adapt quickly to new circumstances, says Ed Yong at Scientific American.

For example, he points to small, seemingly neutral mutations to neuraminidase in the influenza virus that, in conjunction with a H274Y mutation to that protein, allows the virus to evade the effects of Tamiflu.

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