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Lined Up To Be Sequenced

A Reuters story looks into sequencing and health research, particularly focusing on the UK Biobank, a project that aims to enroll 500,000 people to have their DNA sequenced and their health tracked over time. The biobank investigators hope to find rare variants linked to common diseases, building on the work of others, including Decode. Another area of particular interest for sequencing technologies, the article continues, is cancer. "Cancer is maybe the best disease to cut our teeth on," Yale's Richard Lifton tells Reuters. "The reason for that is we know that cancer is largely a disease in changes of DNA sequence." This sidebar to the article also gives a run-down of the big sequencing and analysis players.

The Scan

Study Tracks Responses in Patients Pursuing Polygenic Risk Score Profiling

Using interviews, researchers in the European Journal of Human Genetics qualitatively assess individuals' motivations for, and experiences with, direct-to-consumer polygenic risk score testing.

EHR Quality Improvement Study Detects Demographic-Related Deficiencies in Cancer Family History Data

In a retrospective analysis in JAMA Network Open, researchers find that sex, ethnicity, language, and other features coincide with the quality of cancer family history information in a patient's record.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease Linked to Gut Microbiome Community Structure Gradient in Meta-Analysis

Bringing together data from prior studies, researchers in Genome Biology track down microbial taxa and a population structure gradient with ties to ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease.

Ancient Greek Army Ancestry Highlights Mercenary Role in Historical Migrations

By profiling genomic patterns in 5th century samples from in and around Himera, researchers saw diverse ancestry in Greek army representatives in the region, as they report in PNAS.