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Licensing, Creative Commons, and Other Metaphors You Never Considered for Your Genome

Creative commons licensing is in the air -- or at least in the blogosphere. A few blogs have written about licensing data or even your genome recently. Deepak Singh at BBGM contends that all "data needs to be licensed in some form, even if it’s open," though he acknowledges that while licensing data from papers is pretty straightforward, he's not sure how scientists would deal with the source data, such as "intensities from a microarray experiment."

Meanwhile, over at his Personal Genome blog, Jason Bobe poses the question, "Can a personal genome sequence get a creative commons license?" (No.) Bobe says, "The reason it will not work is because there is no clear legal foundation to build a license on top of when it comes to sequence data."

 

The Scan

Gone, But Now Reconstructed SARS-CoV-2 Genomes

In a preprint, a researcher describes his recovery of viral sequences that had been removed from a common database.

Rare Heart Inflammation Warning

The Food and Drug Administration is adding a warning about links between a rare inflammatory heart condition and two SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, Reuters reports.

Sandwich Sampling

The New York Times sent tuna sandwiches for PCR analysis.

Nature Papers Describe Gut Viruses, New Format for Storing Quantitative Genomic Data, More

In Nature this week: catalog of DNA viruses of the human gut microbiome, new dense depth data dump format to store quantitative genomic data, and more.