Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Scoop Up Cancer Cells for Analysis

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have developed a microfluidics chip that captures rare cancer cells in numbers that are high enough to enable analysis for molecular markers, reports Technology Review's Emily Singer. The device could save patients the hassle and pain of tumor biopsies since a sufficient number of cells could be culled from the bloodstream, and doctors could pick better drugs for their patients by doing the molecular marker analysis, she adds. The device itself has a "herringbone design which generates a vortex in the blood flowing through it," Singer says. "This mixing brings the cells in greater contact with antibodies on the surface of the chip. These antibodies bind to molecules specific to cancer cells."

The Scan

NFTs for Genome Sharing

Nature News writes that non-fungible tokens could be a way for people to profit from sharing genomic data.

Wastewater Warning System

Time magazine writes that cities and college campuses are monitoring sewage for SARS-CoV-2, an approach officials hope lasts beyond COVID-19.

Networks to Boost Surveillance

Scientific American writes that new organizations and networks aim to improve the ability of developing countries to conduct SARS-CoV-2 genomic surveillance.

Genome Biology Papers on Gastric Cancer Epimutations, BUTTERFLY, GUNC Tool

In Genome Biology this week: recurrent epigenetic mutations in gastric cancer, correction tool for unique molecular identifier-based assays, and more.