Leonard Herzenberg, the developer of the fluorescence-activated cell sorter, has died, according to a press release from Stanford University School of Medicine. He was 81. He received a Kyoto Prize in 2006 for that work.

The cell sorter, or FACS, allows researchers to separate cells based on the fluorescent tags attached to antibodies on the cells' surfaces. This, Stanford notes, lets researchers study uncommon cells as well as ones whose population size fluctuates.

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