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Just Have to Admit It

Good scientists must always be willing to be wrong, writes Steven Ross Pomeroy from Real Clear Science at Scientific American's Guest Blog. Pomeroy recounts the story of a lecture given by Richard Feynman at Cornell University during which he explained how theoretical physicists work: They first dream up a new idea, determine what the consequences of that idea are, and then compare those results to direct observations. "If it disagrees with experiment, it's wrong," Feynman said, according to Pomeroy's telling. "In that simple statement, is the key to science."

Pomeroy adds that when scientists realize that they are wrong, it can be "liberating." He says: "a willingness to be wrong frees a scientist to pursue any avenue opened by evidence, even if that evidence doesn't support his or her original hunch."

The Scan

Call to Look Again

More than a dozen researchers penned a letter in Science saying a previous investigation into the origin of SARS-CoV-2 did not give theories equal consideration.

Not Always Trusted

In a new poll, slightly more than half of US adults have a great deal or quite a lot of trust in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Hill reports.

Identified Decades Later

A genetic genealogy approach has identified "Christy Crystal Creek," the New York Times reports.

Science Papers Report on Splicing Enhancer, Point of Care Test for Sexual Transmitted Disease

In Science this week: a novel RNA structural element that acts as a splicing enhancer, and more.