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Just Have to Admit It

Good scientists must always be willing to be wrong, writes Steven Ross Pomeroy from Real Clear Science at Scientific American's Guest Blog. Pomeroy recounts the story of a lecture given by Richard Feynman at Cornell University during which he explained how theoretical physicists work: They first dream up a new idea, determine what the consequences of that idea are, and then compare those results to direct observations. "If it disagrees with experiment, it's wrong," Feynman said, according to Pomeroy's telling. "In that simple statement, is the key to science."

Pomeroy adds that when scientists realize that they are wrong, it can be "liberating." He says: "a willingness to be wrong frees a scientist to pursue any avenue opened by evidence, even if that evidence doesn't support his or her original hunch."

The Scan

Could Mix It Up

The US Food and Drug Administration is considering a plan that would allow for the mixing-and-matching of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines and boosters, the New York Times says.

Closest to the Dog

New Scientist reports that extinct Japanese wolf appears to be the closest known wild relative of dogs.

Offer to Come Back

The Knoxville News Sentinel reports that the University of Tennessee is offering Anming Hu, a professor who was acquitted of charges that he hid ties to China, his position back.

PNAS Papers on Myeloid Differentiation MicroRNAs, Urinary Exosomes, Maize Domestication

In PNAS this week: role of microRNAs in myeloid differentiation, exosomes in urine, and more.