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John Fenn Dies

John Fenn, who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 2002, died, reports The New York Times. He was 93. While he was at Yale University, Fenn developed electrospray ionization as a way to speed up protein analysis. He then tussled with the school over patent rights to electrospray ionization — Fenn personally patented it and then licensed it to a company he started, and Yale took him to court where Fenn was found guilty of "civil theft." Fenn then moved to Virginia Commonwealth University. "John Fenn was one of those scientists whose discovery opened up an entirely new field to investigation; in his case, proteomics — the hallmark science of the post-genomic era," says Thomas Huff, a vice provost at VCU, in a statement.

The Scan

Not Kept "Clean and Sanitary"

A Food and Drug Administration inspection uncovered problems with cross contamination at an Emergent BioSolutions facility, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Resumption Recommendation Expected

The Washington Post reports that US officials are expected to give the go-ahead to resume using Johnson & Johnson's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.

Canada's New Budget on Science

Science writes that Canada's new budget includes funding for the life sciences, but not as much as hoped for investigator-driven research.

Nature Papers Examine Single-Cell, Multi-Omic SARS-CoV-2 Response; Flatfish Sequences; More

In Nature this week: single-cell, multi-omics analysis provides insight into COVID-19 pathogenesis, evolution of flatfish, and more.