John Fenn Dies | GenomeWeb

John Fenn Dies

John Fenn, who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 2002, died, reports The New York Times. He was 93. While he was at Yale University, Fenn developed electrospray ionization as a way to speed up protein analysis. He then tussled with the school over patent rights to electrospray ionization — Fenn personally patented it and then licensed it to a company he started, and Yale took him to court where Fenn was found guilty of "civil theft." Fenn then moved to Virginia Commonwealth University.

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