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It's All Greek to Geneticists

On tomorrow's Science Friday program, host Ira Flatow will discuss the etymology of the word "genome" with the University of Michigan's Howard Markel, as part of the show's monthly Science Diction series. Markel says that "much of our 'genetic' terminology stems from the Greek word, genesis." In 1920, Hans Winkler "collided the German word for gene, gen, with the Greek suffix, -om, indicating body — from soma," he adds. The word "genom," Markel notes, first appeared in Winkler's textbook "Distribution and Cause of Parthenogenesis in the Plant and Animal Kingdoms," that year to characterize "the 'haploid chromosome set, which, together with the pertinent protoplasm, specifies the material foundations of the species.'"

The Scan

Boosters Chasing Variants

The New York Times reports that an FDA advisory panel is to weigh updated booster vaccines for COVID-19.

Not Yet

The World Health Organization says monkeypox is not yet a global emergency, the Washington Post reports.

More Proposed for Federal Research

Science reports that US House of Representatives panels are seeking to increase federal research funding.

PLOS Papers on Breast Cancer Metastasis, Left-Sided Cardiac Defects, SARS-CoV-2 Monitoring

In PLOS this week: link between breast cancer metastasis and CLIC4, sequencing analysis of left-sided cardiac defects, and more.