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It'll Leave You More Time to Write Grants

Michael Barton at Bioinformatics Zen hands out some tips on when to reuse and when to write new code. Libraries already exist -- for instance, BioPerl -- that house functions for many common tasks, such as reading Fasta files or parsing Blast results. Use these to save time, and to have code that's already had its bugs ironed out. If you've got a fix to add to an existing library, he says, do it. "Contributing code first requires getting the library source code using whatever version control system (VCS) the code is managed with. This can be difficult if you're never used a VCS before, but is a good change to learn." If you have to create a new library, make it small and simple, use a version control system, document, and keep it open source.

The Scan

Not Kept "Clean and Sanitary"

A Food and Drug Administration inspection uncovered problems with cross contamination at an Emergent BioSolutions facility, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Resumption Recommendation Expected

The Washington Post reports that US officials are expected to give the go-ahead to resume using Johnson & Johnson's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.

Canada's New Budget on Science

Science writes that Canada's new budget includes funding for the life sciences, but not as much as hoped for investigator-driven research.

Nature Papers Examine Single-Cell, Multi-Omic SARS-CoV-2 Response; Flatfish Sequences; More

In Nature this week: single-cell, multi-omics analysis provides insight into COVID-19 pathogenesis, evolution of flatfish, and more.