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Influencing Doctors

A new study shows that information provided to doctors by pharmaceutical companies results in higher prescribing rates and lower prescribing quality, says Pharmalot's Ed Silverman. The study, published in PLoS Medicine, shows that visits by sales reps, ads in journals, attendance at meetings sponsored by pharmaceutical companies, and participation in sponsored clinical trials all affect what doctors prescribe and how much. "The bottom line: the researchers found that docs who accepted meetings, briefings or other info from drugmakers were more likely to prescribe those products," Silverman says.

The Scan

Not Kept "Clean and Sanitary"

A Food and Drug Administration inspection uncovered problems with cross contamination at an Emergent BioSolutions facility, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Resumption Recommendation Expected

The Washington Post reports that US officials are expected to give the go-ahead to resume using Johnson & Johnson's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.

Canada's New Budget on Science

Science writes that Canada's new budget includes funding for the life sciences, but not as much as hoped for investigator-driven research.

Nature Papers Examine Single-Cell, Multi-Omic SARS-CoV-2 Response; Flatfish Sequences; More

In Nature this week: single-cell, multi-omics analysis provides insight into COVID-19 pathogenesis, evolution of flatfish, and more.