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If at First You Don't Succeed …

Samuel Waksal, the former CEO of ImClone who was made famous when he went to prison for an insider trading scheme involving home crafts maven Martha Stewart, is out and ready to try again, reports the New York Times' Andrew Pollack. Less than two years after being released from prison, Waksal has started a new biotech company called Kadmon Pharmaceuticals, which he says will have "significant revenues," five Phase 3 products, and a couple of Phase 2 products by next year. Kadmon is focusing on cancer, infections, and autoimmune diseases, Pollack says. The company has already licensed an experimental hepatitis C drug from Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, and has acquired Three Rivers Pharmaceuticals, which specializes in hepatitis drugs, according to Pollack.

The Scan

Not Yet a Permanent One

NPR says the lack of a permanent Food and Drug Administration commissioner has "flummoxed" public health officials.

Unfair Targeting

Technology Review writes that a new report says the US has been unfairly targeting Chinese and Chinese-American individuals in economic espionage cases.

Limited Rapid Testing

The New York Times wonders why rapid tests for COVID-19 are not widely available in the US.

Genome Research Papers on IPAFinder, Structural Variant Expression Effects, Single-Cell RNA-Seq Markers

In Genome Research this week: IPAFinder method to detect intronic polyadenylation, influence of structural variants on gene expression, and more.