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The Iceman Hath Come

Researchers have published the full genome of Ötzi the Iceman, a mummy found in the Alps who is thought to have died 5,300 years ago, reports New Scientist's Andy Coghlan. Ötzi's DNA reveals that he had brown eyes, brown hair, was lactose intolerant, and that his descendants live in Corsica and Sardinia, Coghlan says. The study, published in Nature Communications, also shows that Ötzi had a high likelihood of developing heart disease as he carried a mutation that raises the risk of coronary heart disease by 40 percent in modern humans.

Not Exactly Rocket Science's Ed Yong adds that Ötzi's genome shows that he "carried a large genomic region known as the 'Y chromosome', which significantly increases the risk of traipsing about in the a*se-end of nowhere with very little protective clothing, and getting shot by arrows."

The Scan

Pig Organ Transplants Considered

The Wall Street Journal reports that the US Food and Drug Administration may soon allow clinical trials that involve transplanting pig organs into humans.

'Poo-Bank' Proposal

Harvard Medical School researchers suggest people should bank stool samples when they are young to transplant when they later develop age-related diseases.

Spurred to Develop Again

New Scientist reports that researchers may have uncovered why about 60 percent of in vitro fertilization embryos stop developing.

Science Papers Examine Breast Milk Cell Populations, Cerebral Cortex Cellular Diversity, Micronesia Population History

In Science this week: unique cell populations found within breast milk, 100 transcriptionally distinct cell populations uncovered in the cerebral cortex, and more.