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Hype and All That

The US Securities and Exchange Commission filed charges against the stem cell company CellCyte for "falsely telling investors that the company's cutting-edge stem cell technology had been proven successful and was headed for human trials." According to The Scientist, CellCyte licensed stem cell-delivery compounds in 2005 and said that organ repair trials in humans would start in 2008. "The company really tried to take advantage of the hype over stem cells to give the false impression that they were on the verge of clinical trials when really it was just an early stage project that was going to require years of additional research and testing," SEC attorney Steven Buchholz says.

Randy Lieber, the company's acting chief financial officer says, "Once we realized the technology didn't do what the VA told us it would do, we discontinued working on that technology."

The Scan

Renewed Gain-of-Function Worries

The New York Times writes that the pandemic is renewing concerns about gain-of-function research.

Who's Getting the Patents?

A trio of researchers has analyzed gender trends in biomedical patents issued between 1976 and 2010 in the US, New Scientist reports.

Other Uses

CBS Sunday Morning looks at how mRNA vaccine technology could be applied beyond SARS-CoV-2.

PLOS Papers Present Analysis of Cervicovaginal Microbiome, Glycosylation in Model Archaea, More

In PLOS this week: functional potential of the cervicovaginal microbiome, glycosylation patterns in model archaea, and more.