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Helen Ranney Dies

Hematologist Helen Ranney, best known for finding the genetic cause of sickle cell disease died on April 5, reports the New York Times. She was 89 years old. More than 50 years ago, Ranney developed a method of distinguishing normal hemoglobin from the abnormal hemoglobin found in sickle cell patients, the Times says. She also provided evidence that the disease was caused by inherited defects in the structure of the hemoglobin and, according to the article, she developed a method of testing newborns for the disease, before they began to show symptoms at five months of age. She was a faculty member at the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine for more than 30 years, the article reports, and became the first woman at a major American medical school to head a department of medicine.

The Scan

LINE-1 Linked to Premature Aging Conditions

Researchers report in Science Translational Medicine that the accumulation of LINE-1 RNA contributes to premature aging conditions and that symptoms can be improved by targeting them.

Team Presents Cattle Genotype-Tissue Expression Atlas

Using RNA sequences representing thousands of cattle samples, researchers looked at relationships between cattle genotype and tissue expression in Nature Genetics.

Researchers Map Recombination in Khoe-San Population

With whole-genome sequences for dozens of individuals from the Nama population, researchers saw in Genome Biology fine-scale recombination patterns that clustered outside of other populations.

Myotonic Dystrophy Repeat Detected in Family Genome Sequencing Analysis

While sequencing individuals from a multi-generation family, researchers identified a myotonic dystrophy type 2-related short tandem repeat in the European Journal of Human Genetics.