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Good Thing We Didn't Know About This on St. Patrick's Day

Here's why we're grateful for the New York Times' science section: this article reports on a paper published recently demonstrating that "the more beer a scientist drinks, the less likely the scientist is to publish a paper or to have a paper cited by another researcher."

But it's not as simple as separating out the lushes from everyone else, the article says.

Publication did not simply drop off among the heaviest drinkers. Instead, scientific performance steadily declined with increasing beer consumption across the board, from scientists who primly sip at two or three beers over a year to the sort who average knocking back more than two a day.

Now there's a reason to switch to hard liquor.

 

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