Genes of Risk

Why some people hurl themselves down mountains — and do 720s in the air as they do so — may be due, in part, to their genetic makeup, the New York Times' Well blog reports.

A 2006 study of risk-taking in twins found that if one twin sought risks, the other was more likely too as well. Other studies have been trying to home in on genes that might be behind such sensation seeking.

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