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Fred and Ginger Never Had This Problem

Nearly every eukaryote has at least two separate genomes — one in the central nucleus and one in the mitochondria — and when those two genomes act like a pair of "mismatched" partners, the "dance" they do falls apart and the results can be "disastrous," Not Exactly Rocket Science's Ed Yong says. The mitochondrial genome and the nuclear genome, though they evolved in different ways, must work together within the cell. Yong says that according to a paper recently published in BioEssays, "some of the most fundamental aspects of eukaryotic life are driven by the need to keep these two genomes dancing in time," and that many species evolve the way they do because of this pressure to make this "mitonuclear" match.

The Scan

Billions for Antivirals

The US is putting $3.2 billion toward a program to develop antivirals to treat COVID-19 in its early stages, the Wall Street Journal reports.

NFT of the Web

Tim Berners-Lee, who developed the World Wide Web, is auctioning its original source code as a non-fungible token, Reuters reports.

23andMe on the Nasdaq

23andMe's shares rose more than 20 percent following its merger with a special purpose acquisition company, as GenomeWeb has reported.

Science Papers Present GWAS of Brain Structure, System for Controlled Gene Transfer

In Science this week: genome-wide association study ties variants to white matter stricture in the brain, and more.