Fingers in the Ears

The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics released guidelines earlier this year outlining what incidental findings uncovered through exome or whole genome sequencing should be returned to patients whether or not they are related to the reason why those patients sought genetic analysis. The nearly 60 variants are linked to medically actionable disorders for which the patients could seek additional screening or take preventive measures.

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