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Finding Your Name

The Genetic Genealogist has been discussing how DNA testing, particularly of the Y-chromosome, can tell men their surname. He refers to research from Mark Jobling's lab at the University of Leicester that says two men who share the same surname have a 24 percent chance of sharing a common ancestor; that chance increases if the last name is rare. In a related post, he links to a BBC article that says that male adoptees are using genetic genealogy databases for just that reason. Larry Moran says this is an ethical problem since the wishes of the two parties, adoptee and biological father, are at odds. Furthermore, testing could also reveal who is not that person's father.

The Scan

And Back

The New York Times reports that missing SARS-CoV-2 genome sequences are back in a different database.

Lacks Family Hires Attorney

A lawyer for the family of Henrietta Lacks plans to seek compensation from pharmaceutical companies that have used her cancer cells in product development, the Baltimore Sun reports.

For the Unknown

The Associated Press reports that family members are calling on the US military to use new DNA analysis techniques to identify unknown sailors and Marines who were on the USS Arizona.

PLOS Papers on Congenital Heart Disease, COVID-19 Infection Host MicroRNAs, Multiple Malformation Mutations

In PLOS this week: new genes linked to congenital heart disease, microRNAs with altered expression in COVID-19, and more.